Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 38

Thread: Show me yours and I will show you mine

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    7
    Thanked: 0
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    Some pictures of my recently completed recumbent pedicab- what do you think?

    more here- http://s53.photobucket.com/albums/g6...ent%20pedicab/




  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Age
    59
    Posts
    102
    Thanked: 0
    Rep Power
    14

    Thumbs up Very nice

    Very nice Rickshaw robertwb70, I am impressed with your ride. Tell more about it!

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    7
    Thanked: 0
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    I don't know what to tell. Let's see it cost about $1000 to build and weighs about 190 lbs took a couple weeks to build and a couple more to paint, still have a few bugs to iron out(mostly due to trying to use some scavanged parts I had) but it works pretty well.

    I was riding a conventional style cab and it was killing my butt so I started planning this bike, then the restaurant that owned the bike I was riding went out of business so I sped up the build process and now my butt feels much better.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    141
    Thanked: 6
    Rep Power
    12

    Default Looks really good.

    Hey Robert,

    It looks really good. Tell more about the paint process. It looks really sharp. I did not see any rear brake on it. Did I miss it? I don't really know much about recumbents, but it looks like the head tube angle is pretty steep. Does the steep angle work better? Can you ride hands free?

    I'll get some updated pics of my pedicab up soon.

    -Ken

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    7
    Thanked: 0
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    The paint was a mess I found a color I liked at Ace Hardware (a bit lighter shade of yellow) but it dries so slowly I've sworn off Ace paint forever-what's on there now is rustoleum safety yellow. I sprayed it with a regular old fashion siphon feed automotive type spray gun.

    I had an experimental rear brake using a coaster hub-it didn't work out so I'll be putting a disc on it soon. Where I ride the front brake is plenty but I like to have a backup just in case.

    The headtube angle is about 8 degrees which gives about1.25" trail, I can ride no hands up to about 7 Mph where an oscillation kicks in-probably from the cheap suspension fork. Given the weight put on these bikes I like to have the load on the front fork mostly vertical (especially with a cheap suspension fork) and with this particular fork it just worked out like it is-and the angle of the frame probably contributes allot to it looking more vertical than it really is.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    141
    Thanked: 6
    Rep Power
    12

    Default Rear brakes and pics of my bike.

    Hey Robert,

    I have done quite a bit of research on brakes as of late. If you want a real easy solution with plenty of power call up the folks at magura USA and order up one of their "Big Twin" brake sets. I got a quote a few weeks ago for ~$227. This included the lever, 2 180mm disks, 2 calipers, hose and splitter fittings.

    It looks like you have some sort of one wheel drive system. Same for my trike. For mine I am using front 20mm through axle disk hubs off of a down hill bike. This provides easy disc mounting. on your set up it looks like you might need to either weld on some disk mount flanges to your wheel hubs, or go with a single wheel braking in the rear and just mount a disk on the axle.

    To mount to the disc directly to your axle, try the option that my friend Chalo spelled out:

    McMaster-Carr does not support direct links, so I'm going to furnish
    directions instead:

    Go to http://www.mcmaster.com.

    In the "Find Products" search slot, enter "ansi 25 sprockets".

    Click "Drive".

    Click "Finished".

    Under "Bore Size", click 7/8".

    Under "Hub Diameter", click 1-1/2".

    You'll see a small selection of tooth counts appear. I'd go ahead and
    get 36t, just to give me plenty of room to drill in and a little
    bracing for the disc rotor. They are all under $10, which makes them
    about 1/3 the price that I paid for the #41 chain sprockets I got.

    Note that a 1.5" hub diameter means that 5mm disc rotor bolts on a
    44mm BCD will be very close to the edge of the hub (about 0.5mm). The
    sprocket for a #25 chain is only about .100" thick, so the tapped
    threads will have to be good. There isn't enough room for nuts,
    though some creative milling could provide some such clearance.

    All the other plausible options are much more expensive and much, much
    heavier, and at least 3/4" thick where you would have to put the hole
    pattern in.
    You of course would have to drill and tap the holes for the disc mount.

    The bore of the disc would be about 1mm larger than the diameter than the diameter of the center of the drive sprocket hub.

    Here are some more pics of my bike.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Ken Cameron; 19-06-2008 at 07:32.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    7
    Thanked: 0
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    I've looked at just about every option for brakes and decided to go with a disc designed for go-karts and minibikes off E-bay for $35. I'd like to use bike stuff but it gets real expensive and you have to make/ find adapters and all that. If you check out the forum at atomiczombie.com there are lots of ideas there and even a guy who had a batch of 3/4" bore adapters machined for freewheels that could be used to mount a BMX gear or an adapter to mount a bike disc, I think he's selling them for $30. I think the best way to go would be disc mounted right to the hubs, between the wheel and the frame but you'd have to design with that in mind or else do allot of modification.

    Mine is one wheel drive and the go-kart rotor has a 1" bore I'll shim to fit my 3/4" axle with 1"OD x 3/4"ID tube, one wheel braking will be more than enough on the rear where I ride. At some point I might upgrade to a 1" axle making the adapter unnecessary and allowing me to use commercial pedicab wheels without shims but I want to get my moneys worth out of these cheap wheels first.

    I like you're seating arrangement, don't know how many rides I lose because I can only fit 2. One issue with it though is if you only have one person on and go around a corner in the direction opposite the side they're on it could be much easier to tip over, just something to keep in mind, shouldn't be a problem as long as you know the limit.
    Last edited by robertwb70; 19-06-2008 at 18:24. Reason: forgot some stuff

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    141
    Thanked: 6
    Rep Power
    12

    Default Seating arrangement

    Quote Originally Posted by robertwb70 View Post

    I like you're seating arrangement, don't know how many rides I lose because I can only fit 2. One issue with it though is if you only have one person on and go around a corner in the direction opposite the side they're on it could be much easier to tip over, just something to keep in mind, shouldn't be a problem as long as you know the limit.
    Yes I would think your right, about tipping on to two wheels would be easier with one person depending on where they sit. I think that the chances of doing this when not trying to do it are very slim. While it is possible to tip the bike on to two wheels when I ride it alone, it is not exactly easy. I have been thinking of painting a line on the floor board above the axle. If it tipping or weight distribution becomes a problem I'll ask people to sit on top of or in front of the line.

    As for passing up fares because of not having enough seats, I seems to happen all of the time in Austin. I often think that this may just be an excuse used for not wanting to ride as it is not hard to get one of the other pedicabbers to carry additional people. None the less, it is common for customers to want to cram as many people onboard as possible.

    Having 4 seats is some thing that I am trying out to differentiate my cab from the 100 others in this city. I am going for the limo aesthetic rather than the taxi paradigm. Later I will be adding those vertical limo lights, under carriage lights, maybe some custom wheel lights, and an Ipod type sound (maybe video) system running off of a deep discharge SLA battery.
    Last edited by Ken Cameron; 19-06-2008 at 22:15. Reason: clairity

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Age
    59
    Posts
    102
    Thanked: 0
    Rep Power
    14

    Thumbs up Very nice Ken

    I guess the biggest thing you have to worry about is the step on the back. Making sure you are in the saddle when the first people get in. I like the setup and can be a real advantage to getting ride with two couples. Good work Ken!

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    24
    Thanked: 1
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    guys, that is some nice work. I have sure seen my share of garbage out here and those two rigs are very nice. Very Nice indeed.

    My congratulations to you both. ya'll got me motivated to try and find some pics of the recumbent I built back in 96, and its sister I did in 01.

    I really like the mono beam look.
    good on ya.

    Billy O

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Manhattan Rickshaw completes the Race to the Altar on the Today Show
    By Nycpedicab in forum News posted by our users (English)
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-06-2008, 17:04

Visitors found this page by searching for:

Nobody landed on this page from a search engine, yet!
SEO Blog

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •