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Thread: Brake design ideas

  1. #11
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    Default too much brakes

    Yendrek,

    You are probally right about the 203 mm disc giving brakes that are too strong. Another factor about the bike that I am building is that I am using 20" wheels on the back instead of the 24" wheels that the eco-taxi has. I plan to use metallic compound pads to reduce some of the braking power and increase service life. I'll let you guys know how it stops once I get it all put together. More pictures next week.

    -Ken

    Quote Originally Posted by Yendrek3 View Post
    Hi Ken,

    You can always use this twin system with 180mm. One you ride a bit on them and the pads get on with rotors well it becomes so powerfull brake. Alternatively as the lads from Magura advised you you can always bulit your own mount for the the other caliper.

    From my point of view 203mm rotors are not necessarry in this job. We use in Maxpro Ecotaxi 180mm rotors and believe if you dont ware a seatbelts once the lever is pulled you might kiss the ground with your face. It's so powerful, good luck and look forward to your feedback.

  2. #12
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    Can there really be anything like "too much brake" on a pedicab? The less effort it takes, the longer a riders hand will last. And the better it works, I'd say, the longer will last your pads.
    One of the things I've noticed about running discs on the front of my Main Streets is how often the pads finish their life. It has been suggested to me that if I were to run larger rotors, I'd be able to use less brake to achieve the same stopping power, thus the pads would last longer.
    Anybody out there gone to a larger diameter rotor and discovered the truth of this ?
    Billy O

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillyO View Post
    ...<snip>

    It has been suggested to me that if I were to run larger rotors, I'd be able to use less brake to achieve the same stopping power, thus the pads would last longer.
    Anybody out there gone to a larger diameter rotor and discovered the truth of this ?
    Billy O
    I currently have a 203 mm disc with Magura Louise caliper and new organic pads (as of 7/3/2008) on the front of my pedicab. It seems to be fine for 3 evenings that I have run it. I might switch to Magura metallic brake pads if these do not last long enough.

    The larger the rotor, the more leverage it has over the wheel. If all other things are equal (rarely the case) a larger rotor will require less hand pressure at the lever to affect the same amount of stopping force. I would tend to think this would also mean less pressure would be applied to the brake pad. I am not sure that brake pads would last any longer though.

    Magura and other manufacturers offer metallic pads. Magura's ad copy suggests that these pads may have less stopping power but last longer than the organics.

    I went with the organic pads because they are the ones my stuff came with.

  4. #14
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    I have a Indian Rickshaw I am rebuilding to put into regular service and want to add a disk to the front end. i've found a suspension fork (topgun) w disc caliper mounts with the 1" threaded steer tube I needed for the headset and am now thinking through the caliper system. The Magura sounds like the right answer with 180 rotor (single); any recommendations on the new wheel/rotor/caliper/lever/linkage system of choice? Thanks!

  5. #15
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    Pedicabs generally need the strongest brakes at the back. The reason being that if you transfer all the weight to the front - you will snap your forks, you will especially bend suspension forks, in fact they will bend after a week. Ecotaxi, Mainstreet and Maximus all use rim brakes at the front. Maximus had the best with hydraulic Maguras similar to the HSS system. They are awesome brakes - a lot of guys who tour the world use them on their pannier-ridden touring bikes.

    If you can weld some dropouts near the hubs at the rear you will get a better pedicab that can take weight.

    What braking system does it have? Is it a leather strap brake or a piece of wood that rubs on the wheel?
    As part of the license requirements here in BC you must have hydraulic brakes at the back that are inspected annually by an independent bike mechanic who is registered with the city. The reason is because someone ran an indian style rickshaw down a hill in Seattle with two old folks in the back. At the intersection his bike didn't stop an the old man died survived by his wife who sued the crap out of the operator. I know they look cool and old school but why don't you save your cash and buy a western style pedicab with some safety features on it like good brakes?

    Man I sound like a grumpy old man on this site, Im gonna take a break from being your mum.

  6. #16
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    I would also use a 48 spoke 24" tandem wheel at the front and get a lever with a handbrake, honestly pedicabs don't need suspension

  7. #17
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    Indian style rickshaws just don't really work in 1st world countries for some reason. This has been tried in Toronto, Dublin and London and failed. Miserably.

    Lets also not forget that they look really stupid on a first world street.
    Good times and riches and son of a bitches,
    I've seen more than I can recall.
    J. Buffett

    It's all shits and giggles until someone giggles and shits!

  8. #18
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    Indian auto rickshaws need to be able to handle all kinds of shitty roads because that is what India has. Shit roads. I see Indian auto rickshaws in Africa a lot too. Guess what? Africa had a lot of shitty roads.

    What do Indian auto rickshaws have to do with pedal rickshaws? 5 posts in and you haven't really said much.
    Good times and riches and son of a bitches,
    I've seen more than I can recall.
    J. Buffett

    It's all shits and giggles until someone giggles and shits!

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