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Thread: High Resistance Dynamo Hub for Downhill route

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    Default High Resistance Dynamo Hub for Downhill route

    I was wondering if anyone knew of a good dynamo hub (uses friction and/or magnets in the wheel to recharge a small battery) that I could use on a pedicab route which is all downhill. This should be a unit that applies a higher level of friction, in order to limit speed and save my brake pads on the way down a (gentle) several mile hill. Preferably, this unit would be easily engaged/disengaged on the fly. Any suggestions?

    Thanks!

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    Hi Junkomatic,

    The old dynamo from the 80s used to produce friction to generate electricity, the newer style hubs are just reverse style motors and are friction-less.

    I always get a little disconcerted when a pedicab operator wants to save brake pads - I don't think i'd want to take a ride in your rig on that hill you mentioned. You know brake pads only cost $10 right! You need some disc brakes my friend, they work in the rain and will last for a good 500-1000km, they have some awesome kevlar pads on the market now too that will last a lot longer. In most N.American cities disc brakes on pedicabs are mandatory for licensing.

    This front hub dynamo will charge a battery and comes with a disc brake attachment so you can stop without being thrifty!
    http://www.intelligentdesigncycles.c...ohub-pd-7.html

    Only problem with dynamo hubs is they are not built for the weight that a pedicab will put on them through the turns.....why bother - buy yourself a 12V 12aH sealed lead acid battery - they use them in fire alarm systems, and some LED lights like these ones here and a 12v lead acid battery charger and run some wire between your new purchases. I use a similar setup and my batteries last about 3 weeks between charges with about 25 hour a week usage i've also wired up indicators for each bike.

    Good luck on those hills dude, and don't ruin the industry for the rest of us please.

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