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Thread: Pedicabs Development

  1. #1
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    Thumbs up Pedicabs Development

    Maxpro Pedicabs has started work on the new generation pedicab therefore there will be a consultation regarding the most valueable pedicabs features including:
    • Chassis material - alluminium vs steel?
    • Body material - alluminium vs steel?
    • Wheels configuration - what size is most suitable for pedicabs 20'', 23'', 24'' or 26''
    • Loading capacity - two or three people?
    • Drive system - one wheel drive or differential drive?
    • Running gears - SRAM DualDrive vs Shimano index system?
    • Advertising Space - Yes or No? Feel free to express your opinion on the above bullet points. New generation pedicab series will have a three pedicabs in it's collection:
    1. Pedicab - Rickshaw - fast and easy transport sollution
    2. Pedicab - Pedicab - universal pedicab, easy ride and smooth with advertising space
    3. Advertising Pedicab - maximum advertising space, ideal for promotions and campaigns
    Maxpro is currentlly the only manufacturer who makes it's vehicles fully alluminium. If you want to express your opinion about this technology please send your feedback via Maxpro's website www.maxpropedicabs.com or just publish your post now.

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    Post Ref: Pedicab Developments

    For the sub frame - I quite like stainless steel but the same as aluminum it's 'brittle' & needs good design not to break. If it does break, it's a pain to fix .

    The body is good in any material that allows saving of weight but still enough strength to protect passengers - PE, aluminum, steel, composits, fiber glass..... ect AS LONG as they again do not break with regular use.

    26" is very nice but not always so good regarding strength, any one know of a strong 26" wheel, maybe even without spokes????????

    Diffs are nice again for riders but not so nice for mechanics

    Running gears - which ever work best over time

    Ad space is good but not every thing.

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    Lightbulb

    Over time Aluminium fatigues and loses some of its strength- this usually takes in excess of 5 years though... also, due to the greater amount of material used, aluminium is generally stiffer and less compliant, reducing comfort a bit. Steel doesn't suffer from age hardening and is far easier to repair. Cro-mo alloys tend to offer the best compromise between strength/weight/cost 4130 being the most popular.

    Friedel has pretty much covered the body. Phwoar?... maybe not

    26" is probably never gonna work out in the long run, because of the extra leverage from the hub centre, although the flex in the spokes may counteract this... also using 48 spokes could be an option, but there is only a couple of rims available; HALO is the only manufacturer I can think of off the top of my head who do 48 spoke 26ers

    36H Rims to try would be Mavic EX729, DMR DeeVee, Atomlab Trailpimp- these are all highly rated by gnarly mountain bikers- mainly used for bouncing off rocks and 20' drops.

    I personally reckon 24" is the perfect compromise, because you get the improved rolling of a 26er, but with a bit more strength to boot; since weight isn't really a major issue (especially if you go 1 wheel drive- your rotational mass is way less) you could go with a 48 spoke build and pretty much forget about maintenance.

    Also take into account front wheel size- I think that 20" tends to put too much force on the fork crown, where it goes into the frame, since there will always be a tendency for the majority of the weight to try to 'ride' over it during braking, although conversely, the additional fork length on 26" means the fork is liable to bend... however, there are some pretty meaty forks out there for trials and dirt jumpers, so it could be simple enough to remedy using standard components. Also on the subject of front wheels, a V brake should be sufficient, since most of the braking force is done via the rear... maguras and discs are just throwing money away and adding to complexity.

    3 people is always going to be the ideal, cos its more income for riders and thus more rent for operators.

    Drive system- for ages, my mind was set on 2 wheel drive, but its totally unneccessary and apart from the additional cost, the complexity adds to maintenance and from a riders perspective rotational mass. 1 wheel drive all the way.

    Gears- Although hub gears offer the luxury of stationary shifting, their reliability and cost means I would avoid them, although if you wanted to be flash and try a Rohloff hub, maybe that would be peachy. Apart from that, shimano and SRAM derailleurs would be much the same in this application, SRAM maybe having the slight edge in that the cables will need less adjustment, but they would probably snap before that became an issue.

    Ad space is always gonna win you browny points- if you want to market your Pedicab, the wily businessmen who will buy them will always want an additional revenue stream... but it should be a bonus, rather than encroaching on the function as a cab.

    There's my 2 cents and then some, I can't believe I just gave away all of my cunning secrets.

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    Talking and my two pecne

    Thanks ty004 for your thoughts. Do appreciate it. I must say I share your views with you mostly.

    I think that 24'; wheels are the best solution, not in the long run as they maybe slightly too weak but if someone has got some brain in the head then they are all right, but the advantage of those is that they are lighter than any others. Halo SAS 48 holes sound good but slightly expensive but definetley worth it.

    Aluminium frame as you said, is loosing some strength after few years but still is much lighter and well designed don't need to be fixed for life time.

    About gear I must say SRAM< SRAM< SRAM only. And the reason why is becuase you fit them once and don't tuch them for a months. New series is much stronger than the Dualrive and I'm talking about sx5 and up. Reason why you don't do too much with SRAM is that 1. yoy don't bent cables for 180 degrees and secondly is 1:1 shift what means that is not so sensitive for dirt and mess in the outher.

    Anyhow, do appreciate your points, glad that someone have got some knowledge about pedicabs. Big THANK also for Friedel and his point of view

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    Thumbs up Triple fork for the future

    Well, I suppose it's no good knowing a thing if nobody maketh the thing & secrets are all well & good if you use them to do the competition but if never used about as much use as an empty 'fanny' pack (just love that American idea).

    So, let’s get back to the chat:

    Meeee thinks V brakes will never be as strong as the same version in hydraulics which is what you need when you want to stop 3 fat lads & ‘chunky’ the rider. The great invention to counter the issue of greater force on the steering column – triple-crown head set. Yes, triple!!!!!!!

    I now have had the pleasure of many months of watching forks mashed by little B*(rascals) using things like lamp posts, back of taxis & things that don't move & a good triple fork bends with love but does not snap or crack making it the marvel of the new age.
    don't move & a good tripple fork bends with love but does not snap or crack making it the marvel of the new age.

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    Wink Wheel deal

    Damn you guys, you have set my brain in motion and its gaining momentumn.

    With regard to rear wheels, one of the major bains of the pedicab world, surely the answer lies in using a wider and/or larger diameter hub... in so doing, this would angle the spokes more efficiently for distributing the axial load encountered in cornering (with 3 rugger buggers hanging off the sides)- obviously there would be an optimum for this- my guess would be flange spacing (as opposed to entire hub spacing) somewhere around 120-140mm for 24" running dishless, although of course it is the spoke angles themselves that will count, and that depends on flange diameter:- it may pay to do a bit of research into the wire spoke wheels they use on blinging cars to see their solutions.

    Also, a larger hub body will allow larger bearings, spaced further apart; win win.

    If only I had access to a lathe I would knock some up, but I don't, so I'll just sit here as my brain bleeds ideas.
    Last edited by ty004; 15-01-2007 at 16:04.

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    Lightbulb Buhaahaha!

    Quote Originally Posted by ty004 View Post
    Also, a larger hub body will allow larger bearings, spaced further apart; win win. If only I had access to a lathe I would knock some up, but I don't, so I'll just sit here as my brain bleeds ideas.

    Yes, but did you know that Mr Mainstreet has the axels that would offer this up for testing & I'm sure the hunt for wisdom should continue with real world trials! Well, & I believe that a member of this chat has a brother who workes with lathe's .

    So more talk or a bit of action ?

    I quite fancy strong wheels on my pedicab of the future .

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    Lightbulb Light heat formed body

    Well, I'm currently looking at what to do for the body of my new pedivan & am playing with heat formed plastics, which should be also great for another thing being made

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    Question HUBS bits and pieces

    Hello TY004, Tdyauk,

    I really do appreciate all your point of view, some of them are quite interseting, with some of the we are all familiar.

    What TY004 has mentioned about the hub diameter is true, but but but there is always this BUT. There is a bounder in it. the angle of the spokes to the rim can not be too sharp, why? becuase too sharp angle will bent nippel and spoke. too much strength working for it, what in the final result will cause spokes snapping. And obviously we don't fancy broken spokes, that's bad very bad and I think very unpleaseant boring job to do with pedicabs.

    About large hub diameter I must also disagree. Bearings inside the hub body is bad, very bad solution. I'm not gone say why as I must keep some secrets for myself


    But anyhow, thanks again for your valueable suggestions.

    MOLTE GRAZIE RAGAZZI

    p.s Friedel what's that plastic you talking about?

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    Question 4 wheel trike?

    Thinking about it, I was kind of chasing ideals anyway... custom machined hubs are never gonna be cost effective for the numbers likely to be produced; I guess that 48 spokes is the way to go or meaty (and heavy) motorbike rims and spokes. As for the bearings, I know where you're coming from, I was just thinking of advantages over normal bike hubs, although to some extent, the rotational mass and sealing advantages of hub mounted bearings (at least on the non-drive side) would counteract some degree of the additional wear and thus maintenance, but once again, reverting to specialist hub bodies, so impractical.

    One other idea which may merit some degree of consideration is a 3rd rear wheel, centrally mounted (probably 20" to allow seat clearance), thus distributing the load further and reducing direct rotational mass... however, I am skeptical to some extent due to the likelihood of tyre scrub and uneven weight distribution during cornering... has a design of this nature ever been attempted?

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